Herald Journal Columns
March 25, 2002

'Seize the day' my friend used to say

By LYNDA JENSEN

A college friend of mine used to cherish the words of author and inspiring lecturer Leo Buscaglia.

"Seize the day," is a saying that Buscaglia made popular, of which my friend lived by.

She was a very energetic person.

Here are some antedotes that pertain to him.

Buscaglia once talked about a contest he was asked to judge. The purpose of the contest was to find the most caring child.

The winner was a 4-year-old child whose next door neighbor was a elderly gentleman who recently lost his wife.

Upon seeing the man cry, the little boy went into the old gentleman's yard, climbed onto his lap, and just sat there.

When his mother asked him what he had said to the neighbor, the little boy said, "Nothing. I just helped him cry."


As I was driving home from work, when I stopped to watch a local Little League baseball game that was being played in a park near my home. As I sat down behind the bench on the first base line, I asked one of the boys what the score was.

"We're behind 14 to nothing," he answered with a smile.

"Really," I said. "I have to say you don't look very discouraged."

"Discouraged?" the boy asked with a puzzled look on his face.

"Why should we be discouraged? We haven't been up to bat yet."

Prayer of unknown confederate soldier

The following is something I've had for several years.

I asked God for strength that I might achieve.

I was made weak that I might learn humbly to obey.

I asked God for health that I might do greater things.

I was given infirmity that I might do better things.

I asked for riches that I might be happy.

I was given poverty that I might be wise.

I asked for power that I might have the praise of men.

I was given weakness that I might feel the need of God.

I asked for all things that I might enjoy life.

I was given life that I might enjoy all things.

I got nothing that I asked for ­ but everything I had hoped for...

Almost despite myself, my unspoken prayers were answered.

I am among all men most richly

blessed."


Here is another story that I came by, to keep your mind off the late winter we've been having.

An eyewitness account from New York City, on a cold day in December:

A little boy about 10 years old was standing before a shoe store on the roadway, barefooted, peering through the window, and shivering with cold.

A lady approached the boy and said, "My little fellow, why are you looking so earnestly in that window?"

"I was asking God to give me a pair of shoes," was the boy's reply.

The lady took him by the hand and went into the store and asked the clerk to get half a dozen pairs of socks for the boy.

She then asked if he could give her a basin of water and a towel. He quickly brought them to her.

She took the little fellow to the back part of the store and, removing her gloves, knelt down, washed his little feet, and dried them with a towel.

By this time the clerk had returned with the socks.

Placing a pair upon the boy's feet, she purchased him a pair of shoes. She tied up the remaining pairs of socks and gave them to him.

She patted him on the head and said, "No doubt, my little fellow, you feel more comfortable now?"

As she turned to go, the astonished lad caught her by the hand, and looking up in her face, answered the question with these words:

"Are you God's wife?"


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