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Times are a changin’ – yet too much is staying the same

June 30, 2008

by Kristen Miller

With gas at $4 a gallon, our lives have seemed to be revolving around gas, more so than at $3 a gallon.

People are changing their summer travel plans, changing where they live, how they get to work, and what they do for fun.

It seems there is nothing that hasn’t changed because of high gas prices, except how we’re going to pay for it. Not to be depressing, but even our attitudes have changed.

I know I am struggling to get by and it’s definitely taking a toll. It almost makes you want to crawl under a rock and come out when gas prices go down to $3 a gallon (if there ever will be a time).

I don’t know, but there is something disgusting about dropping $45 (and more) at the pump each week.

Our checks are literally going into our tanks, and it’s quite unsettling.

Not only do we pay more at the tanks, but because of higher gas prices, we are paying more everywhere, especially the grocery store.

Because of high gas prices, people are choosing life alternatives. For example, people are taking public transit instead of their own cars to get to work. Well, now transit fees are going up because people are using it more.

A person just can’t get around it.

Also, GM has just announced its 2009 vehicles prices will go up by 3.5 percent or, on average, $1,000 per vehicle, due to rising commodity costs.

The only thing that isn’t going up is housing, which I guess is dirt cheap now. Unfortunately, no one can afford to buy a home because of rising costs everywhere else.

One just can’t win or get ahead.

What I want to know, is there anyone getting richer, or are we all just getting poorer?

I think everyone is hoping once a new president gets into office, American’s will finally catch a break. I’m just not sure how that is going to happen. I don’t think the candidates know, either. They are both just trying to make us feel hopeful in a time of such vulnerability.

Will we ever catch a break? Gosh, I hope so.

What made the Great Depression a depression was the drought. At that time, everything revolved around farming and crops for families to make a living.

Well, this is quite comparable. The only difference is that gas is now our crop, and it unfortunately affects everything we do, as well as, what we don’t do.